Finding a New School

Author: Joe Beverly |

Finding a New School in a New City

A fresh start in a new city is exciting. If you have children, that means a fresh start at a new school. With so many choices in education, how do you choose the best environment for your child in an unfamiliar city? Below are a few tips to consider as you begin the search for the perfect school.

“Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school” -Albert Einstein

A fresh start in a new city is exciting. If you have children, that means a fresh start at a new school. With so many choices in education, how do you choose the best environment for your child in an unfamiliar city? Below are a few tips to consider as you begin the search for the perfect school.

What are your Child’s needs?

Children learn in different ways and require different approaches in learning and behavior. Some children need individual attention and some thrive in an environment that fosters creativity. Many schools specialize in areas that may be beneficial to your child’s needs. Placing your child is the right environment will build confidence and give a sense of security. The US Department of Education provides a

great list of questions that will help you consider the needs of your child as well as your family.

What’s in a name?

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover nor should you judge a school by its name. Whether you are considering a private or public school, don’t rely on the name alone. There are excellent schools in both categories. Judge a school on what you find on the inside. Test scores and demographics are important but the teachers and school leadership create the much wanted story book endings.

Ask around

What better way to get information on a prospective school than to talk to the parents! If you are relocating, you may not have the luxury of talking to neighbors and parents face to face. GreatSchool.org is a great website that compiles reviews from parents. Your real estate agent may also have some insight or personal experience of his/her own.

Go for a tour

You test drive a car and you tour prospective homes, so why not do the same for a new school? If you are in the neighborhood on “moving” business, take the time to make a site visit. Ask to observe teachers in class and play close attention to the interaction between the office staff, teachers, students and parents. You do not have to be an expert to get a feel of the school culture. If you had a pleasant experience and enjoyed your time there, there is a good chance your child will too.

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Joe Beverly

Joe Beverly